Person Index

Pike, Julia Catherine

Julia Catherine Pike
b: 1862
d: 2 OCT 1932
Biography
Christ Church''s Web Site
236 BUCK Alfred James Seldon
236 BUCK Mary Ann

233 BUCK Edwin Douglas Seldon
233 BUCK Janet Ann

38 BUCK George Green
38 BUCK Mary Ann Seldon
38 BUCK Percy
38 BUCK William S.

38 KEMBLE Henrietta
38 KEMBLE Robert

38 PIKE Cecil Seldon
38 PIKE Elizabeth Seldon
38 PIKE Evelyn Seldon
38 PIKE Gordon Seldon
38 PIKE Julia Catherine
38 PIKE William Seldon


Evening Post 13 July 1874
A popular entertainment was given at the Masonic Hall, Lower Hutt, on Thursday evening, the proceeds going to St James'' Church Building Fund. The programme consisted of readings, songs, glees, and solos and duets on the piano. Miss R. Riddiford, Miss Julia Buck, Miss Julia Pyke (sic) and the Misses Riddiford gave the solos and duets, Mrs Major Clifford, Mrs Fancourt, Miss R. Riddiford, and Mrs Mudgway played the accompaniments. Mrs Major Clifford, Mr George Beetham, and Mr George Williams, of Sandon, gave several fine song; and Mr Beetham, sen, Mr Thomas Mason, Mr Horsfall, and Mr George Hedges some very select readings. The Rev Thomas Fancourt occupied the chair.


Marriage Details
1882/1156, Bride: Julia Pyke (sic), Groom: Alphonsus Rush

Evening Post 15 July 1891
PARISH MEETINGS.
ST. JAMES'', LOWER HUTT.
The annual meeting of the parishioners of the above parish was

held at the schoolroom, Lower Hutt, on Monday evening, the chair being taken by the Incumbent (Rev. J. Jones). The report and balance-sheet were read by Mr. Cheesman, and after several of those present had expressed their views, both were adopted as read.
The report presented by the Vestry was a very lengthy

one, and was to the effect that a considerable improvement had

taken place in the financial condition of the parish, the

balauce of liabilities over assets having been reduced by about

£65, only about £50 being required to extinguish all

liabilities, and this was expected to be accomplished during

the present year. The increased revenue was mainly derived from seat rents and offertories at St. James'' and subscriptions from

Petone. The extinction of the debt to the Diocesan Pension

Fund, amounting to £27 17s 6d, was due to the efforts of the

ladies'' sewing bee. A large sum had also been obtained by means

of entertainments. The liability now existing is mainly made up

of an overdraft arranged to meet the punctual payment of

assessment and other regular calls. The Taita Church was

found to require immediate repair, and the Vestry authorised an

effort for its being substantially repaired. Funds to enable

this being done were raised by means of a donation from the

ladies'' sewing bee, and supplemented by other sources, an old

parishioner who was now in England having sent a donation of

goods, which had realised £10. Some improvements were desired

in the Petone Churchroom, and a fund to enable those to be

carried out had been, raised by local special effort. The

rights of the parishioners in the churchyards had received

attention, and regulations for this purpose had been drawn up,

and would come into force when the Taita Cemetery was ready for

use. Tho portion of the cemetery allotted to the Church had

been placed under the control of the Vestry. Useful work had

been done by the Petone Sub-Vestry, the organisation of

collection being very efficient. A misunderstanding of a

financial nature had to some extent disturbed the harmony of

that part of the parish with the rest, and the settlement of

the matter would fall on the incoming Vestry. Regular services

had been maintained with the assistance of Messrs. K. Wilson,

W. F. Cheesman, J. C. Small. C. P. Powles, H. Gaby, and E. B.

Brown as lay readers. A long series of wet Sundays had

affected the attendance and also the offertories in the early

part of the year, the services at Christ Church on several

occasions being omitted. On acconnt of the difficulty in

providing teachers, the morning Sunday school services at St.

James'' had been discontinued. Mrs. Jones continues to

superintend the St. James'' school, while the Petone one was

supervised by Mr. Jenkins, the infants at the latter being

efficiently managed by Mrs. P. Smith. Christ Church school was

under the management of Miss A. Welch, Mrs. Rush, and Mr. A.

S. Pyke. The voluntary services of Mrs. Rush and Miss Welch as

organists at Christ Church, and Mr. Sherwin as choirmaster at

Potone, were commended to the grateful acknowledgment of the

parishioner. An engagement stipulating that as soon as

practicable the assessment should be increased to as to enable

a stipend worthy of the parish to be given to the incumbent, it

had not been possible to carry out as yet, but as a matter of

simple justice the Vestry commended the matter to the

consideration of the parishioners, the duty becoming more

urgent with the delay. The thanks of the parish were due to the

lady collectors for their services, and the attention of the

incoming Vestry was invited to the desirableness of further

developing this branch of parish work. The Vestry desired to

record their sense of the loss which the parish had sustained

by the death of Sir W. Fitzherbert, who in the earlier days had

taken an active part in parish matters, and as long as his

health had permitted had been regular in his attendance at

church ordinances.
A vote of thanks was passed to the ladies''

sewing bee for the services rendered by them during the year.
A long discussion ensued as to the necessity for further services at Petone Churchroom, and a resolution was passed that the incoming Vestry take into immediate consideration the urgent necessity of further administration in the Petone subdivision of the parish.
Mr. W. F. Cheesman was re-appointed incumbent''s church warden, and Mr. J. R. Ransom was re-elected parishioners'' churchwarden. The Vestry elected were as follows:— Messrs. W. A. Fitzherbert, A. Collett, J. Wilkins, S. C. Barraud (Lower Hutt); R. C. Kirk and E. J. Jenkins (Petone); S. Death (Taita). Auditors, Messrs. Whitton and Price.
Votes of thanks having been passed to the Sunday school teachers, lady collectors, members of the choirs, and also to the members of the Christ Church Union, the meeting terminated. At a meeting of the Vestry later on, Capt. Humfrey and Messrs. W. A. Fitzherbert and W. F. Cheesman were elected nominators.

1893 Otaki Electoral Roll Julia Rush, Residence: Taita, Occ: Music Teacher

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Evening Post 19 March 1887
...
On WEDNESDAY we hold an auction at Mr. Rush''s Dairy Farm at the Taita. Purchasers will please leave by the 10.15 a m. train to the Hutt, thence by bus.
...
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WEDNESDAY, 23rd MARCH,
At 11 o''clock.
To Dairy Farmers, Poultry Dealers, Livery Stablers, &c. FRANCIS SIDEY & CO. have received instructions from Mr. Alphonsus Rush to sell by auction, at his dairy farm, the Taita —
6 splendid young cow''s (lately calved)
2 trap horses, 1 Berkshire boar, lot of pigs
200 fowls, all last year''s pullets, splendid layers
20 tons clover hay, 8 tons oat sheaves, stack of heavy wheat, 4 spring traps and harness, new double wheel Hornby plough, churns and dairy utensils
6 hives of bees, large lot of honey, and home-made jams
All the household furniture, including a really magnifiaent toned Mignon piano, 2 violins, music
80 gallon boiler, &c, &c.
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As Mr. Rush is leaving the district, all the above will be sold absolutely without reserve, and it will well (sic) repay anyone to make purchases at this sale.


Evening Post 17 August 1887
RUSH V. RUSH
This was a petition by Julia Kate Rush for a judicial separation on the ground of the cruelty of her husband, Alphonsus Rush.
Mr. A. de D. Brandon appeared for the petitioner and Mr. Fitzherbert for the respondent
All witnesses with the exception of the petitioner and respondent were ordered out of Court.
Mr. Brandon asked that the respondent should also be ordered out.
Mr. Fitzherbert objected, and his Honour upheld the objection. The petitioner deposed that she was married to the respondent on the 8th May, 1882, at the Lower Hutt. After the marriage he quarrelled with her. After completing a honeymoon trip in the Wairarapa, she went to live with her mother at the Taita until a house her husband, a farmer, was building at the Taita was finished, while she was staying with her parents, and within a fortnight of the marriage, he abused her. This was as they were driving into Wellington. A couple of weeks after that there was a quarrel because there was no likelihood of there being an issue of the marriage. For some time after this she and her husband did not speak. His behaviour did not improve very much after that. He, however, kept silent for two or three weeks, and again he abused her, calling her a barren pig. She had known her husband for twelve months before marriage. They had been neighbours at the Taita. About a year after marriage, and when they got into the new house, they had a quarrel because she contradicted him, and he throw her down, but did not strike her. He had a bad temper, and was in the habit of telling lies. She recollected visiting Palmerston North on a visit to his parents, who had taken up their residence there. She returned home in a fortnight, and there was another quarrel. He did not knock her about, but was sulky with her. This was in the early part of 1885. In May of that year they had a dispute as to the quantity of liquid a certain measure could hold, and he threw her down and bruised her. He said that he would kill her. She recollected the opening of the Wellington and Manawata Railway. On that day she went to Palmerston to visit his people. She returned on the following Wednesday, and he met her at the Lower Hutt Railway Station. After she had got into the trap, he asked her how she had enjoyed herself, and she replied "Pretty well." He then said, "Are you sure ?" and she replied that if she had been better treated by his people she would have enjoyed herself much better. He then threatened to throw her out of the trap, and said that she did not care for him or his people When they got to the gate of the farm, they had a scrimmage. He said that she should not go home with him. She recollected the 19th of January last. On that day he accused her of helping his brother-in-law to buy the place, so that he might be ousted. She told him that it was all imagination. McDowell was the brother-in-law''s name. McDowell was now living in Palmerston. When she told him that it was all imagination, he ordered her inside the house, but she refused, and he then pushed her into the house. He dragged her across the kitchen, but she took hold of him and made him sit down, and tell her what he was cross about. He then jumped up and threw her against the wall. He then placed her across his knee, having previously sat down, and put one hand on her throat. On the 3rd of February he had a dispute with the hired boy, Harvey, and, leaving the latter alone, he turned on her. He threw her over a chair. She rose, and again he threw her down, this time nearly stunning her. She was bruised on the nose and on the body, and she was hardly able to do any work for some time. While he was ill-treating her he threatened to kill her. She threatened to leave him, and he said she could go. She came in to town and saw Mr. Wardell, R.M., who advised her to go back, take a witness, and ask her husband whether he would agree to a separation. She went back, and in the presence of her brother, Arthur Pyke (sic), asked her husband whether he would agree to a separation. He said he would decline to go in for a separation. He told her to take her things and leave the house. She packed up her things, but did not leave the house until the following morning. The young man Harvey was in the house from the Thursday to the Monday before she left, and her mother was there on the Monday night. On the Friday and Saturday nights preceding her departure she slept on the sofa.
By Mr. Fitzherbert — She did not tell Mr. John Taylor, before she was married, that she hated Rush, and was only going to marry him to please her mother. She also knew Mr. Henry McKenzie, brother-in-law of Mr. Taylor. She did not tell Mr. McKenzie that she hated Rush, and did not care about marrying him. She met Mr. McKenzie at the house of Mr. Taylor, where she had stayed for some time. Mrs. Taylor never spoke to her about her familiarities with Mr. McKenzie. During the time she was staying at her mother''s house, after the marriage, he only visited her once. She co-habited with her husband during the time she was in the house. He did not complain about being deprived of his marital rights during the time she was living with her parents. After her marriage she visited Dr. Collins, who told her that she could not bear children until an operation had been performed. She did not refuse to have the operation performed. She said that she was willing an operation should be performed. The reason the operation did not take place was because her husband could not spare the amount, about £5. She recollected a concert and dance at the Hutt. She asked her husband whether he was going, and he said he was too tired. This was on the 19th of last January. It was not true that he pushed her inside so that he might get into the house. On the 3rd of February, 1886, her husband asked the boy Harvey why he had allowed a horse to break some harness. Harvey replied that he could not prevent the damage, as he was looking after another horse at the time. Some words ensued between Harvey and Rush, and her husband called the boy a liar. It was not a fact that the boy used bad language to her husband on that occasion. When her husband told Harvey to leave the farm she did not say she would go too. She could not say her things and Harvey''s things were placed on the cart at the same time. Her husband accused her, but wrongfully, of being in the dairy without lights, and whispering to Harvey. This was just before she left for good. When she went to Palmerston she knew that Harvey was there on a holiday. Mr. Rush, senr., had brought young Harvey up from childhood, and when she was in Palmerston she and he lived in her husband''s house. The last row with her husband was not on account of jealousy, but it arose through Harvey. The house provided by her husband was a nice one, but it was not furnished as it ought to be. It was comfortable enough. There was a Mignon piano in the house. She had plenty to eat and drink, but her husband did not provide her with sufficient wearing apparel. On the 25th of last February she went down from her mother''s house and had a talk and a walk with her husband. They again quarrelled. He said that he considered it was a disgrace she should leave him. If Harvey had remained on the farm she would not have gone back. She had not been induced by her mother or anyone else to keep away from her husband. He was always kind to children, but he had been very unkind to her.
Elizabeth Pyke, wife of George Pyke, farmer, at the Taita, and mother of the petitioner, deposed that she lived close to where Rush, the respondent, had resided. Rush had not been at all kind to her daughter. On the 19th of last January, she saw him throw his wife backward on the scullery floor and drag her through the kitchen into the front passage, where he placed her across his knee and nearly choked her. Witness remonstrated, and her daughter then got up and staggered against the wall. He then pushed her (witness'' daughter) about. Witness found bruises on her daughter''s body, and one of the eyes was injured. Rush frequently accused her daughter of doing wrong things. Whenever his wife came into town he accused her of going in for the purpose of seeing men, and whenever she went to a dance he said that she misconducted herself. So far as witness knew, her daughter had always conducted herself properly. Her daughter was not a woman of a nagging disposition.
By Mr. Fitzherbert — The arrangement made before the marriage was that the wife should live with witness. So far as witness was aware, Rush did not want his wife to live in another house while the new one he was building was being erected. Her daughter was a good tempered woman. Witness believed her daughter was not averse to being married to Rush. Witness did not visit her son-in-law''s house frequently, until some time after the marriage. For three years before the couple separated she used to visit them every day. It was not a fact that witness was now keeping the couple apart. She did not consider Rush a kind man. When the young man Harvey left, she noticed that his things and her daughter''s were on the cart at the same time, and she prevailed upon her daughter to take her things off the vehicle.
John Harvey, farm labourer, deposed that he was in Rush''s employ for about two years, and previous to that was in the service of Mr. Rush, senior. On the night of 19th February last he and Rush had a row about a horse that had broken away. Rush said that he had called him "a b - liar." Witness denied this, and then Rush said he was a liar. Mrs. Rush made a remark while they were having the altercation, and Rush shoved her down several times. She was at last stunned, and witness picked her up. While she was lying on the sofa Rush offered to fight the both of them. Witness had had a row once before, but would not leave because he could not get his money. He slept in the house He always considered that Rush spoke roughly to his wife. Sometimes he told her to "go to the devil."
By Mr. Fitzherbert — Witness was only 11 or 12 when he went to live with Mr. Rush, sen., and he was now 21. He recollected going up to Palmerston North. He believed he told Mrs. Rush that he was going up to that town. He did not receive a letter from her while he was in Palmerston. He met her on the platform, and learning that she was going to stay at Mr. Rush, sen.''s, house he took her up there. He did not know that she was going up to Palmerston. He was not in the garden with her for more than an hour. He was not in her company for more than two hours the whole of the first day. The next day he went with her for a walk in the country. He stayed in Palmerston for six or seven weeks, and then returned to Mr. Rush, junr., at the Taita. On the night of the last row he did not recollect wiping his hands on Mrs. Rush''s apron. He would swear that he did not call Rush a b - liar. Rush did not say that he would not have him in the dairy with his wife in the dark. Rush said he would not have him on the premises any longer, and witness said he would go. He had seen Rush knock his wife down on two or three different occasions. Rush was a good master. Witness believed Mrs. Rush had a comfortable home, and was at liberty to go in and out when she pleased. Mrs. Rush had as good a temper as most women.
Re-examined — Witness when in Rush''s service was not employed about the house to any extent. This closed the petitioner''s case. [Left sitting.]

Evening Post 18 August 1887
Divorce Court.
YESTERDAY.
(Before the Chief Justice.)
RUSH V. RUSH.
This case in which the wife prayed for a judicial separation, on the ground of cruelty, was concluded at 4.30
John Harvey was recalled by Mr. Fitzherbert after the luncheon hour adjournment, and deposed that, so far as he knew, Mrs. Rush slept with her husband for the four nights prior to the day he left.
By the Court - It was quite possible she slept on the sofa by herself for the four nights in question.
Mr. Fitzherbert having opened the case for the respondent, called Alphonsus Rush, who deposed that he had been farming at the Taita He was now living at Palmerston North. After coming from Wairarapa on their honeymoon his wife went to live at her parents, and after being there a few days she came into Wellington and stayed, much against his will, with a Mrs. John Taylor. All that time he was denied connubial rights. After a while he got permission from Mrs. Pyke for his wife to leave Mrs. Taylor''s and live with him. When they came back from Wairarapa he wanted her to live in a house until the premises then in course of erection were finished, but she asked to be allowed to stay with her parents, and he agreed. Instead, however, of staving at her parents house she came into Wellington and stayed with Mrs. John Taylor. There had been several tiffs between them. She frequently misunderstood him, and getting into a rage would attempt to scratch him. He was in consequence obliged to hold her away from him. On the 19th of January last, she wanted him to go to a dance at the Lower Hutt, but he said he could not go, as he was too tired, having been hay-making all the day. She was annoyed at his refusal. He pushed her down, as she was standing in the doorway, and she caught hold of his coat and tore it. She afterwards repaired it, saying she was sorry, for what she had done. It was not true that he had ever taken her across his knee. On the 3rd of February, the young man Harvey proposed to take Mrs. Rush to the races. Witness objected at breakfast time. Later on in the day he saw Harvey wipe his hands on Mrs. Rush''s apron. This annoyed him very much. Again, at night time he heard them whispering in the dairy. There were no lights in the dairy. In the evening he and Harvey had some words about a horse, and Harvey called him "a b _ liar." Mrs. Rush interfered and witness was obliged to catch hold of her hands to prevent her from scratching him. She might have fallen over a chair. He might have pushed her down. He did not knock her down, and she was not stunned. It was a horrible lie to say that she was stunned. Mrs. Rush dared witness to dismiss Harvey. The three of them had supper after the row on Thursday. At that time Harvey said that if witness would pay him £8 10s, wages due, he would leave at once. Witness offered him a horse in payment. Harvey refused, and witness was obliged to borrow money from Mr. Sidey. When witness told him on the following Monday that he was square with Harvey, she said that she would leave the house. He was very much surprised to find her''s and Harvey''s things on Mrs. Pyke''s trap. She did not, however, leave until the following morning. Witness and his wife slept together on Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday nights. She would not cohabit with him on Monday night — the night Harvey left. A young man named Hayward visited the house on Sunday night, and Harvey, Hayward, witness and his wife passed a sociable evening together. Mrs. Pyke also came down on the Sunday afternoon and took her daughter out for a drive in his light trap. About three weeks after this Mrs. Pyke wrote and asked him to go up to her house. Witness did not go, but his father went instead. He told his father that if his wife would come back he would be glad. Subsequently his wife came down, and they had a long talk in his garden. He told her it was a sad affair about her leaving, and she said it was. She said she was sorry for what had occurred, She went in and played the piano and stayed to tea. Everyone was jolly, in fact they were all "up a tree." After tea he went down to milk the cows, and she came down and kissed him and said she was going back to her mother''s. Before this, on the same day, and when in the garden, she condoned the offence. He would say that, if the words were the last he uttered on earth. She offered to return, but he would not pay Mr. Brandon''s costs. There had been some little difficulty between them respecting the want of issue.
His Honour asked the witness whether he could not come to some arrangement with his wife?
The witness said he had not pressed the present case. He had not sufficient grounds for divorce. Then there was the objection that he belonged to the Catholic Church, and could not be married again if he was divorced.
Mr. Brandon said that the real question between the parties was one of maintenance. Several efforts had been made to reconcile the parties, but Mrs. Bush had always been averse to going back to live with her husband.
The witness said that he objected to pay for a woman who would not live with him, and who had borne him no children.
The witness, cross-examined by Mr. Brandon, said that he never threatened to throw her out of the trap as they were driving from the railway on her return from Palmerston. He never touched her on that occasion. He had not a bad temper. Two phrenologists had told him that he had a very good temper. (Laughter.) He had tried to be as kind as possible to his wife. When he borrowed the money from Mr. Sidey to pay Harvey his wages he had not then instructed Mr. Sidey to sell his furniture. He did not instruct Mr. Sidey to sell the goods until after he had exhausted every means to get his wife back.
Mr. Fitzherbert announced that he would call four or five more witnesses if the Court thought further evidence was necessary.
His Honour said there was nothing to show that the wife''s actions on the Thursday, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday preceding her departure had not been voluntary on her part.
Mr. Brandon said he was not in a position to carry the matter any further.
His Honour dismissed the petition on the ground that there had been condonation. In doing so he said that, so far as the case had gone, there was not the slightest suspicion of misconduct against the wife as in connection with the young man Harvey. The case was an unfortunate one, and he hoped that means would be found to bring about a reconciliation.
It was agreed that the question of costs should be argued in Chambers.




Evening Post 5 October 1889
We are pleased to learn that the subscription list for the purchase of an organ for the Taita Episcopal Church has been successfully completed. An organ was purchased from Messrs. Hoffman and Co., and was despatched by them to the Taita this week. Mr. Hautrie West kindly undertook the selection of the instrument, and all who have heard it are loud in its praise, for sweetness of tone and compass. The subscriptions were gathered by Mrs. John Taylor, and Mrs. Rush, the organist. We congratulate the congregation upon the acquisition of such a fine organ for their church.

Evening Post 15 July 1891
PARISH MEETINGS.
ST. JAMES'', LOWER HUTT.
The annual meeting of the parishioners of the above parish was

held at the schoolroom, Lower Hutt, on Monday evening, the chair being taken by the Incumbent (Rev. J. Jones). The report and balance-sheet were read by Mr. Cheesman, and after several of those present had expressed their views, both were adopted as read.
The report presented by the Vestry was a very lengthy one, and was to the effect that a considerable improvement had taken place in the financial condition of the parish, the balauce of liabilities over assets having been reduced by about

£65, only about £50 being required to extinguish all liabilities, and this was expected to be accomplished during the present year. The increased revenue was mainly derived from seat rents and offertories at St. James'' and subscriptions from Petone. The extinction of the debt to the Diocesan Pension Fund, amounting to £27 17s 6d, was due to the efforts of the ladies'' sewing bee. A large sum had also been obtained by means of entertainments. The liability now existing is mainly made up of an overdraft arranged to meet the punctual payment of

assessment and other regular calls. The Taita Church was found to require immediate repair, and the Vestry authorised an effort for its being substantially repaired. Funds to enable this being done were raised by means of a donation from the ladies'' sewing bee, and supplemented by other sources, an old parishioner who was now in England having sent a donation of goods, which had realised £10. Some improvements were desired in the Petone Churchroom, and a fund to enable those to be carried out had been, raised by local special effort. The rights of the parishioners in the churchyards had received attention, and regulations for this purpose had been drawn up, and would come into force when the Taita Cemetery was ready for use. The portion of the cemetery allotted to the Church had

been placed under the control of the Vestry. Useful work had been done by the Petone Sub-Vestry, the organisation of collection being very efficient. A misunderstanding of a financial nature had to some extent disturbed the harmony of that part of the parish with the rest, and the settlement of the matter would fall on the incoming Vestry. Regular services had been maintained with the assistance of Messrs. K. Wilson, W. F. Cheesman, J. C. Small. C. P. Powles, H. Gaby, and E. B. Brown as lay readers. A long series of wet Sundays had

affected the attendance and also the offertories in the early part of the year, the services at Christ Church on several occasions being omitted. On acconnt of the difficulty in providing teachers, the morning Sunday school services at St.

James'' had been discontinued. Mrs. Jones continues to superintend the St. James'' school, while the Petone one was supervised by Mr. Jenkins, the infants at the latter being efficiently managed by Mrs. P. Smith. Christ Church school was under the management of Miss A. Welch, Mrs. Rush, and Mr. A. S. Pyke. The voluntary services of Mrs. Rush and Miss Welch as organists at Christ Church, and Mr. Sherwin as choirmaster at Petone, were commended to the grateful acknowledgment of the parishioner. An engagement stipulating that as soon as practicable the assessment should be increased to as to enable a stipend worthy of the parish to be given to the incumbent, it had not been possible to carry out as yet, but as a matter of simple justice the Vestry commended the matter to the consideration of the parishioners, the duty becoming more urgent with the delay. The thanks of the parish were due to the lady collectors for their services, and the attention of the incoming Vestry was invited to the desirableness of further developing this branch of parish work. The Vestry desired to record their sense of the loss which the parish had sustained by the death of Sir W. Fitzherbert, who in the earlier days had taken an active part in parish matters, and as long as his health had permitted had been regular in his attendance at church ordinances.
A vote of thanks was passed to the ladies'' sewing bee for the services rendered by them during the year.
A long discussion ensued as to the necessity for further services at Petone Churchroom, and a resolution was passed that the incoming Vestry take into immediate consideration the urgent necessity of further administration in the Petone subdivision of the parish.
Mr. W. F. Cheesman was re-appointed incumbent''s church warden, and Mr. J. R. Ransom was re-elected parishioners'' churchwarden. The Vestry elected were as follows:— Messrs. W. A. Fitzherbert, A. Collett, J. Wilkins, S. C. Barraud (Lower Hutt); R. C. Kirk and E. J. Jenkins (Petone); S. Death (Taita). Auditors, Messrs. Whitton and Price.
Votes of thanks having been passed to the Sunday school teachers, lady collectors, members of the choirs, and also to the members of the Christ Church Union, the meeting terminated. At a meeting of the Vestry later on, Capt. Humfrey and Messrs. W. A. Fitzherbert and W. F. Cheesman were elected nominators.

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Below notes from Pye Kelly web site

Name of Julia Kate Pike from William Seldon Pike''s Will document

In William Seldon Pike''s Funeral Notice she is listed as Miss J. K. Pike, 189 Main Road, Lower Hutt

In Gordon Seldon Pike''s Funeral Notice William Seldon Buck, lived at Blackbridge, Lower Hutt

*Birth Details Date: 1862, Folio No: 332, Area: Christchurch, No quarter listed, Name: Julia Catherine Pike*

1905 - 1906 Hutt Electoral Roll shows Julia Kate Pike, Blackbridge, Hutt, Married?

1922 Hutt Electoral Roll shows Julia Kate Pike, Main Road, Lower Hutt, Married?

1925 Hutt Electoral Roll shows Julia Kate Pike, 189 Main Road, Lower Hutt, Spinster

*Death Details Date: 1932, Folio No: 3537, Area: Hutt, December quarter, Name: Julia Catherine Pike*

The Evening Post 3rd October 1932 shows
Pike - On 2nd October, 1932, at her residence, 571, High street, Lower Hutt, Julia Catherine Pike; aged 70 years. A patient sufferer at rest
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Funeral Notice
The Friends of the late Julia Catherine Pike are respectfully invited to attend her Funeral, which will leave her late residence, 571, High street, Lower Hutt, Tomorrow (Tuesday), 4th October, at 2 p.m., for the Taita Churchyard Cemetery.
J. R. Croft, Undertaker, Tel. 63-828, Hutt and Petone

Cemetery Fiche for Church Christ Cemetery, Taita shows Record No: 136
Percy Buck husband of Constance Mary died 11 September 1957
William Seldon Pike 29 January 1929 aged 63 years
Julia Catherine Pike died 2 October 1932 aged 70 years
Facts
  • 1862 - Birth - ; Christchurch Area
  • 2 OCT 1932 - Death -
Ancestors
   
?
 
 
George Hale Pike
1844 - 4 SEP 1902
  
  
  
?
 
Julia Catherine Pike
1862 - 2 OCT 1932
  
 
  
George Green Buck
1 APR 1818 - 11 OCT 1894
 
 
Elizabeth Seldon Buck
31 MAY 1844 - 28 APR 1901
  
  
  
Mary Ann Seldon Salmon
1817 - 4 JUL 1867
 
Family Group Sheet - Child
PARENT (M) George Hale Pike
Birth1844
Death4 SEP 1902
Marriage1862to Elizabeth Seldon Buck
Father?
Mother?
PARENT (F) Elizabeth Seldon Buck
Birth31 MAY 1844
Death28 APR 1901
Marriage1862to George Hale Pike
FatherGeorge Green Buck
MotherMary Ann Seldon Salmon
CHILDREN
MArthur Seldon Pike
Birth1869
Death28 AUG 1940
Marriage1897to Isabella Finch
FEvelyn Seldon Pike
Birth27 MAY 1866Taita
Death1866
MErnest Seldon Pike Pike
Birth1872
Death25 NOV 1918
Marriage6 NOV 1907to Winifred May Brown
MCecil Seldon Pike
Birth1874
Death1874
MCyril Seldon Pike
Birth1876
Death18 JUL 1949
Marriage1910to Mary Ann Harris
FLeila Seldon Pike
Birth1880
Death15 FEB 1960
FNoeline Anglea Pike
Birth1883
Death17 FEB 1952
Marriage1905to Arthur George Seldon Dale
MGordon Seldon Pike
Birth1885
Death6 JUL 1909
FJulia Catherine Pike
Birth1862Christchurch Area
Death2 OCT 1932
Marriage1882to Alphonsus Rodger Unsure If Correct Person? Rush
MWilliam Seldon Pike
Birth4 JUN 1865
Death29 JAN 1929
Family Group Sheet - Spouse
PARENT (M) Alphonsus Rodger Unsure If Correct Person? Rush
Birth1857
Death
Marriage1882to Julia Catherine Pike
FatherJohn George Rush
MotherCecilia Eliza Herbert
PARENT (F) Julia Catherine Pike
Birth1862Christchurch Area
Death2 OCT 1932
Marriage1882to Alphonsus Rodger Unsure If Correct Person? Rush
FatherGeorge Hale Pike
MotherElizabeth Seldon Buck
CHILDREN
Descendancy Chart
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